Framing Time

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Installation view 1

Left to right: Ed Ruscha (cases), Augusta Wood, Robbert Flick

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Installation view 2

Left to right: Ed Ruscha (cases), Stephen Berens, John Divola, Uta Barth

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Installation view 3

Left to right: John Divola, Uta Barth

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Installation view 4

Left to right: Uta Barth, Sharon Lockhart, Ed Ruscha (cases)

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Installation view 5

Left to right: Stephen Berens, George Legrady

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Installation view 6

Left to right: Dihn Q. Le, Sharon Lockhart (background), Tim Hawkinson, 

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Installation view 7

Ed Ruscha, Every Building on the Sunset Strip, 1966

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Installation view 8

Ed Ruscha, Every Building on the Sunset Strip, 1966

Framing Time

UTA BARTH ∙ STEPHEN BERENS ∙ JOHN DIVOLA ∙ ROBBERT FLICK ∙ TIM HAWKINSON DINH Q LÊ ∙ GEORGE LEGRADY ∙ SHARON LOCKHART ∙ ED RUSCHA ∙ AUGUSTA WOOD

Framing Time is a group exhibition featuring photography-based works by ten contemporary artists with formative or working connections to Los Angeles. Each artist approaches the concept of temporality with unique and evocative applications of a medium that inherently lends itself to the capture of time. With projects ranging from the poetic and conceptual to the obsessively documentary, Framing Time presents investigations of its passing and ephemera from its arrest. In place of the static snapshot, or frozen 'Kodak moment' - an idea popularized by the company's iconic 60's ad campaign - these artists offer complex and layered sequences of photographic imagery, redistributing the visual narrative of the medium somewhere between the cinematic and the experiential.

Framing Time features critical works by Uta Barth, Stephen Berens, John Divola, Robbert Flick, Tim Hawkinson, Dinh Q Lê, George Legrady, Sharon Lockhart, Ed Ruscha, and Augusta Wood, all of whom have pushed the boundaries of photography in experimental ways. Shared among the examples from this group of artists is an interest in the medium's living dimensions, and its potential, to capture movement, subtle shifts in environment, incremental changes in observed or staged subjects, and even its sculptural or plastic possibilities through process-oriented interventions. Whether in pursuit of the primary moment, a lost history, a collective view, or an impression of time and place, these works are similarly in search of the physical traces of dead, transient time. This essential haunting, long the indisputable domain of photography, remains as poignant as ever, especially in an age of digital dissimulation and increasing disembodiment. A medium of longing and evasion, it's shadowy dimensions are fugitively caught, offering us the vague evidence of our own mortality.